09/18/2008

Fall Protection

Falls are one of the leading causes of traumatic occupational death. Falls are
caused by improper scaffold construction, the misuse of portable ladders,
unprotected floor holes, and other unaddressed safety hazards. These hazards
can be countered through the use of proper protective equipment and procedures.

There are a number of ways to protect workers from falls including conventional
systems such as guardrail systems, safety net systems and personal fall
protection systems (fall arrest systems, positioning systems and travel
restraint systems) as well as through the use of safe work practices and
training. The use of warning lines, designated areas, control zones and similar
systems are permitted by the U.S. American Department of Labor Occupational
Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) in some situations and can provide
protection by limiting the number of workers exposed and instituting safe work
methods and procedures. These alternative systems may be more appropriate than
conventional fall protection systems when performing certain activities.
Whether conducting a hazard assessment or developing a comprehensive fall
protection plan, thinking about fall hazards before the work begins will help
to manage fall hazards and focus attention on prevention efforts. If personal
fall protection systems are used, particular attention should be given to
identifying attachment points and to ensuring that employees know how to
properly don and inspect the equipment.

The U.S. American Department of Labor Occupational Safety & Health
Administration (OSHA) recommends that employees:

  • Cover or guard fall holes as soon as they are created during new
    construction.

  • Construct all floor hole covers so they will effectively support two times
    the weight of employees, equipment, and materials that may be imposed on the
    cover at any one time.

  • Use guardrail systems and personal fall arrest systems for scaffolds more
    than 10 feet above a lower level.


More info


AplusA-online.de - Source: U.S. American Department of Labor Occupational Safety & Health Administration