06/26/2017

Updated heat safety app

Many people are exposed to heat on the job, outdoors or in hot indoor
environments. Operations involving high air temperatures, radiant heat sources,
high humidity, direct physical contact with hot objects, or strenuous physical
activities have a high potential for causing heat-related illness. Workplaces
with these conditions may include iron and steel foundries, nonferrous
foundries, brick-firing and ceramic plants, glass products facilities, rubber
products factories, electrical utilities (particularly boiler rooms), bakeries,
confectioneries, commercial kitchens, laundries, food canneries, chemical
plants, mining sites, smelters, and steam tunnels.

Outdoor operations conducted in hot weather and direct sun, such as farm work,
construction, oil and gas well operations, asbestos removal, landscaping,
emergency response operations, and hazardous waste site activities, also
increase the risk of heat-related illness in exposed workers.

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and OSHA have
collaborated to update OSHA's original Heat Safety Tool. The updated app,
available for both Android and iPhone, provides a clearer user interface, while
still providing the same information to help keep workers safe when working
outdoors in hot weather. Extreme heat causes more deaths than any other
weather-related hazard; many more people seek medical treatment for extreme
heat exposure.

Employers should encourage workers exposed to hot and humid conditions to use
the app to check the heat index and relevant protective measures. The app
displays the heat index in the user's location and shows the current risk
level. The app also forecasts the hourly heat index throughout the entire
workday, giving employers information they can use to adjust the work
environment as needed to protect workers.

More than 450,000 users have downloaded the original app since it was launched
in 2011. The original OSHA app will no longer function after September 30.

More info


AplusA-online.de - Source: Occupational Safety and Health Administration